World globalization and charity

Charities are an interesting effect of globalization. Without globalization there would hardly be any charity. We think about spending a little money to feel better about something and/or somebody we don’t know on the other side of the planet. 

 

One of the best examples lately was when we think back to 2012 and the effect of Kony, a youtube video which went viral within a few days.

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People started to feel and wanted to care for people they didn’t even know and the response was huge. The video spread over youtube in a speed no one expected with more than 100 million views the first week. At the end the video was quite controversial due to not very clear information about facts, as well as blaming a single man for the existence of child soldiers. The fact that also government military used children as soldiers was left out. People donated money without clearly knowing where it would actually go. 

The video shows that people believe too fast in what they see, especially in moving images. Seeing this and knowing about it makes them feel better. Spending money on it makes them feel even the best. They did something against a striking problem in the world. After that this far away problem is forgotten, as are the countless homeless people and children in distress right when we leave our house, in our own country and city.   

 

 

Another interesting Video I found is activist Dan Pallotta talking about how we actually think about charities. Non-Profit organizations are rewarded for small amounts they donate but not for what they actually have achieved or which big impact they try to achieve in the future. We have to change our way of thinking about charities just spending tons of money, but thinking about what they really do and change in the world. We can only succeed by mistakes and throwbacks to get a lot of steps further, knowing how not to do it. This takes a big risk of loosing things, but for a better purpose. In this case it is money, our money.

 

Leopoldine Liechtenstein

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